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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of their political department. according to the russians, he works for the cia. they say they caught him red handed in an unconvincing blond wig in the process of trying to recruit some of their own or one of their own, russian special services agents. they say they caught him with what essentially amounts to a spy kit, which included a compass, a flashlight, a couple of pocket knives and they also say a big bundle of cash, sunglasses, another wig, and a written letter which they say were instructions for the man that he is trying or accused of trying to recruit there. he's been released back to u.s. embassy officials. and the russian foreign min sfree now says that he's persona non grata, he's been being exspelled from the country. >> it's not surprise that the russia has spies and the u.s. has spies and they're out there spying on each other. this comes at an awkward time in the relationship between the two countries which was frothy and then is thawing out a little. >> it has been frosty over the last 18 months since vladimir putin returned to the presidency of this country and the russian gover
and insist he is a cia officer posing as a secretary in the american embassy. they said he had disguises and special equipment, a compass, sunglasses, and thousands of euros. ,n the middle of the night three more american diplomats were summoned by the investigators. in the video, recording here at the headquarters, and officers seems to be telling off the americans. he said he could not believe that of this time increasing corporation, after the boston bombing, an american diplomat would commit such a crime against russia. iny claim ryan fogle was possession of this letter offering $1 million for information. why go so public with the scam? >> it seems to me it is about ortr the people as spies. of 2006 whenoes britain was accused of using this electronic rock to spy on russia, a claim that turned out to be true. the last major u.s. spy scandal was in 2010 when they were expelled from america. she has become a fashion model and television presenter. in a move reminiscent of the cold war, ryan fogle has been told he is persona non grata in russia, the first diplomat to be thrown out of t
, and the russians say he also had a letter promising millions to spy for the cia. >>> going public with a very personal decision. angelina jolie has undergone a double mastectomy after a test revealed her high risk of breast cancer. tonight, the questions it's raising for millions of other women. >>> and the legal limit, a big change could be on the way. it concerns how much alcohol you're allowed to drink before getting behind the wheel. you're allowed to drink before getting behind the wheel. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television
. he said basically the revisions to the e-mails are what we described as a manipulation of the cia to get the truth that you want. he referred to it saying it was clear from the get-go that terrorist activity was involved in the attacks in benghazi, those that left four americans, including the u.s. ambassador there dead. today we heard from mccain as well as senator kellie ayotte, saying they want further testimony from hillary clinton, then secretary of state. here was representative issa earlier today, explaining the priorities to his committee. >> was the response correct? could it have been better? why weren't things at least tried or revved up to be tried. afterwards, how could you change talking points 12 times from what seems to be relatively right to what seems to be completely wrong? >> what i hear being assessed is all kinds of ulterior motives. i don't believe they existed. i don't think you can question that there was ma levelens on the part of the president, on the part of the secretary of state or anyone else. it was a very unfortunate incident that turned in to be,
on the hamid karzai claiming cash payments from the cia and that these cash payments are continuing, and he's been confirming this and claiming it in afghanistan, and senator corker was hoping for an explanation from the president. and he said it's now been two letters, and he hasn't gotten an explanation. >> i'm not aware of the letters. i'll have to take the question. the specific story itself involves the cia, and i'd have to refer you to them. >> still -- >> with with regard to the letters, i'll let you know if there's a response. >> jay? >> yeah. >> jay, you've used this formulation about the president's support for unfettered investigative reporting a number of times here. to what extent is he, is the former constitutional law professor in the oval office torn between that philosophy and the case for, you know, going after leaks? >> i think the appropriate way to describe it is that the president believes there needs to be a balance. because there is an interest in making sure that classified information that isceps -- that is sensitive is not leaked because of the consequences to nat
investigation was to determine who leaked details about a cia operation in yemen which foiled a terrorist plot. and while people like rnc chairman reince priebus suddenly emerge from hiding to call for the attorney general's head on a platter, holder, himself, said today he recused himself from the decision to seek those media records to avoid any conflict of interest. but that he did support the investigation into a dangerous leak. >> it is the top two or three most serious leaks that i've ever seen. it put the american people at risk, and that is not hyperbole. it put the american people at risk. and trying to determine who's responsible for that, i think, required very aggressive action. >> and as mr. holder prepares to be grilled by the house judiciary committee wednesday, it's worth noting this whole investigation was called for by members of congress such as senator john mccain. >> i call on the president to take immediate and decisive action, including the appointment of a special council, to aggressively investigate the leak of any classified information on which the recent stories wer
, the a.p. reported that a c.i.a. operation in yemen had foiled an al qaeda plot to bomb an airliner bound for the u.s. that same day a.p. reporter adam goldman spoke to the newshour's kwame holman about the decision to publish >> you had been in discussions with the u.s. government about holding the story and decidetog. the government did not want this story reporedolleagues and i learned about this plot as it was unfolding. and we agreed for national security reasons that we would not publish once those concerns passed we decided today that the public had a right to know that the u.s. had thwarted what we considered to be a very serious plot against aviation. >> woodruff: the justice department has not confirmed that story is the focus of the investigation and the white house, jay corny would not give specifics. >> i can't comment on the specifics but i can tell you the president feels strongly that we need a -- the press to be able to be unfettered in its pursuit of investigative journalism. he is also mindful of the need for secret and classified information to remain secret and classi
what's happening. because the cia has gotten drawn in a little bit to what's going on. rake in has not officially told the cia to do anything like this. they get reagan to sign, december 1985 what's called a presidential finding, a document that authorizes covert operation to a piece of paper that says for these reasons i order these agencies to do this and this and this, and is very specific. there were two things about this finding in december 1985 that were highly unusual, highly unusual. the first thing is it's retroactive. it's contrary to the law. the law states clearly a fine is supposed the signed by the president before the covert action is initiated. not after it's been going on. this finding december 1985 cents explicitly all prior actions are hereby ratified and approved. second thing that's unusual, it states especially, the document does, don't tell the house and senate intelligence committees about this. don't tell them. it's a very, very unusual and questionable document that reagan signed. so why did he do it? it's basically because people, the to insist that reaga
terror plot. that story disclosed details of a cia operation in yemen that stopped an al qaeda plot to detonate a bomb on an airplane. brian todd, cnn, washington. >>> new details emerging about the 1-year-old brother of leila fowler who is under the arrest for the fatal stabbing of his sister. a student in a school administration source say the boy was suspended from his middle school for five days earlier this year after he brought a small pocket knife to school. the boy is not being named because he is a minor. he is being held at a juvenile detention center. because of his age, he cannot be tried as an adult in california. >> a suspect identified in the mother's day parade shooting in new orleans. police trying to find him. they're search for 19-year-old akine scott. 19 people wounded, three critically. still not clear if there was more than one shooter. authorities are offering a $10,000 reward in this case. >>> new this morning, three boats carrying up to 150 muslim refugees capsizing off the coast of myanmar. search and rescue operations are under way at this hour and a spoke
of his disguise allegedly trying to recruit a russian for the cia. 29-year-old ryan fogle, a junior level diplomat caught with sunglasses, maps, money, offering up to $1 million a year, instructions for opening a gmail account. russians released him to the u.s. embassy. he'll probably be sent home. at washington's spy museum a former cia spy says it happens all the time. >> i've used disguise. sometimes something as simple as a wig and glasses will do that. even though it may look sort of corny, or sixth grade to people, it can work. >> reporter: russians call it provocative. u.s. officials don't believe it will set back communications, the boston bombing and standoff in syria. secretary of state meeting with russian counterpart in sweden, presumably not trading spy story. for "today," andrea mitchell, nbc news, washington. >>> the widow of the boston bombing suspect tamerlan tsarnaev will cooperate with investigators according to new attorney that has defended several suspects before. russell has not been charged but the legal team has yet to release details of what she saw in the days l
by the c-i-a during looking for the assault suspect who seriously attacking him with a skateboard. kron 4's alecia reid tells us what initiated the pacifica police are searching for this manaround midnight april 27th police say the suspect got into an accident on southbound highway 35 near hickey boulevard. both him and the driver of the other vehicle stopped at the fairmont shopping center to exchange information. when the victim opened the glove compartment to get his paperwork, police say the suspect bludgeoned him in the face and head with the deck of a times.leaving the victim with serious injuries. the suspect is described as a black man between 17 and 23 years old, 5 feet 9 police are also looking to question the passenger that was in the suspect's car. she's considered black, anywhere from 17 to 23 years old, with dark eyes, black hair and a chubby build. the getaway car is a blue 4 door sedan with minor to moderate damage on the driver side front quarter panel -- with silver paint transferred from the victim's car. in pacifica, alecia reid kron 4 news. you kids should count yoursel
there was no there-there. on friday we learned the cia talking points went through 12 rounds of changes with the heavier than usual previously thought involvement of the state doe apartment and the white house. that it was outlined in a series of e-mails. here's what the president had to say about it all today. >> the whole issue of this, of talking points, frankly throughout this process has been a sideshow. the e-mails that you allude to were provided by us to congressional committees. suddenly three days ago, this gets spun up as if there's something new to the story. there's no there-there. and the fact that this keeps on getting churned out, frankly, has a lot to do with political motivations. we've had folks who have challenged hillary clinton's integrity, susan rice's integrity, mike mullen and tom pickering's integrity. it's a given that mine gets challenged by these same folks. they've used it for fund-raising. >> was the president right? is the issue of how the talking points were changed a political sideshow? u.s. congressman michael turner is on the oversight and government
of benghazi. that's a non-scandal. basically it was a turf war between the c.i.a. and the state department and the see jay began to walk back some of their allegations. i still there's a benghazi issue on why we didn't send support troops when ambassador stevens and others were in trouble. that issue when no action was taken that could have averted some catastrophe. i think that part remains an issue. >> i think that's a legitimate area of inquiry. but i think the real problem, judy, that faces -- judy, the federal government -- if you're going to make a case for it, it abolished slavery, it ended segregation, it built the land grant colleges that have produced more nobel prize winners than all the universities of europe combined. it saved the great lakes. it took 99% of the lead out of the air. it took wanton terror out of old age through social security. there's a case to be made for government and when government -- confidence in government and its integrity and competence is undermined, i think it's up to the president to rise to its defense and to say anybody who does this and threate
. the leak harmed a cia operation. it wanted to find out where the leak came from. they got those phone records. is that legal? how much freedom are we able to give up for so-called security? judge andrew napolitano is here. a slippery slope. did the justice department get a warrant from a judge to go get those records? >> well, we do not know, but we assumed by statements made that they use the patriot act authority which allows authorities to write their own search warrants as british soldiers were able to do prior to the american revolution -- stuart: yes, yes, yes. >> it directly contradicts the fourth amendment. they do not go to a judge, they do not present evidence of probable cause. agent a authorized agent be to do it. they show up within agent written search warrant. they serve it on the telephone company and the telephone company says, here are all the bills, telephone calls made and telephone calls received. stuart: could you make the case? it reaches the constitutional principle. >> yes. stuart: could you make a pragmatic case that the government needed this? they could det
is run." this as e-mails became public showing the administration changed cia talking points on terrorist involvement in the libya attack just before the presidential election. >> the whole issue of this -- of talking points, frankly, throughout this process has been a side show. suddenly, three days ago, this gets spun up as if there is something new to the story. there's no there there. >> reporter: but republicans see opportunity and they're accusing the president of hiding the truth. >> where is the outrage all along as things like this keep happening? the patterns becoming one in which this administration is not transparent and they don't seem to care if the right things are done. >> now, the chairman of the house judiciary committee, at least on the story involving the seizure of phone records of associated press reporters and editors says that congress will fully investigate the situation. to that end, christine, there was already a previously scheduled hearing on wednesday before that committee that attorney general eric holder is set to testify at. he is going to be asked very to
the investigation -- director of the national central agents -- cia, this is national security. is what senator feinstein said. i think we should have been told. why not notify under the law the proper authorities here in the united states congress, specifically the head of the intelligence community, and why not notify the president of united states? -- >> again, there is a strong tradition and concern within the justice department not to reveal ongoing criminal investigations. theere sensitive to possibility of a national security concern. we do not think that one existed. present the nine states? -- the presidents of the united states? i would think that is the one person who should absolutely know what is going on. there was a potential that the director of the cia had been compromise, that you are investigating, why not share that with president obama? shareause, we do not ongoing criminal investigation. if you look back, and conclusions we reached were correct. we do not have a national security -- it is an ongoing investigation. it's an ongoing investigation. >> but the time is expired.
for 42 years in the army come the state department, the defense department and 25 years with the cia most recently as the division chief in the office of soviet affairs. he has authored, co-authored and edited seven books and he is currently a senior fellow at the center for international policy and an adjunct professor of government at johns hopkins. it's clear that he is constantly writing and he has published just about everything except maybe "people" magazine. ladies and gentlemen i'm very pleased to introduce the author of the "national insecurity," mel goodman. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you for the intro and thank you for the invitation. to talk about the book here. i am glad you started with eisenhower. i am going to start with eisenhower, greatly underestimated president. are you having trouble in the back? it greatly underestimated president. john talked about one morning. i briefly want to talk about for more -- warnings that eisenhower gave and i think you will appreciate in terms of national security policy and defense policy. you have to appreciate these warni
in russia. the u.s. ambassador to russia was summoned to a meeting today over the claims he captured a cia agent posing as a diplomat. this is new video of the ambassador today. he came out 30 minutes later. never said a word to reporters waiting outside. the man is identified as ryan fogel. he's been ordered to leave the country immediately. he was caught, they say, disguised trying to recruit a russian security officer as a spy. >>> a new lawyer for the widow of boston bombing suspect tamerlan tsarnaev says his client will continue to cooperate. last week, joshua doppler radarle joined katherine russell's dradle joined katherine russell's questions. according to an unnamed source, boston's fire chief is receiving a vote of no confidence. 14 signed an order saying they do not think he's fit for doing his job. today marks one month since the attack. >>> the social network linked- in is banning profiles who people work in the world's oldest profession. they are updating the policy and their user agreement. it now explicitly forbids escort services or prostitution, even if it's legal where t
of a highly classified effort to foil a terror plot. >> officials tell us cia thwarted an al qaeda plot in yemen to detonate a bomb of a powerful explosive. >> reporter: at the time, fbi director robert mueller strongly condemned the leak. a leak like this is explosive. >> reporter: according to "a.p.," among the lines tracked were office and personal numbers of "a.p." reporters and editors, including their home and cell phone numbers. and main numbers used by the u.s. house of representatives. there was no actual listening in on calls, the ap says. ap gary pruitt says it's amounting to serious interference. advocates for journalistic freedom agree. >> the fact it was so broad, so many phone lines over a two month period and they made no attempt to negotiate to get any kind of information beforehand is outrageous. >> reporter: a former cia spokesman said leak investigations are demanding but he's surprised by the scope of this one. >> it tells me this is a very significant case in the government's eyes and willing to take the heat they will take from the news media in order to track dow
that perhaps benghazi talking points or e-mails back and forth between the state department or cia are not as compelling or understandable for most americans. but in this case it's difficult for the white house, particularly when they're having to comply with all kinds of investigations and everything else that's going to happen with congress, we're just seeing the beginning of these hearings and it's a big deal. i will point out the "new york times" has a great piece today looking at there were actually some liberal groups lumped in among these 400 groups, the vast majority of them were conservative. but there are about two dozen liberal organizations that got extra scrutiny. >> i wanted to ask you with our next topic, as a journalist your perspective on the controversy around the associated press, here's what came out on politico: "conflicting information is emerging over the process the justice department used to approve the subpoenas for associated press telephone record." >> it's difficult for me to take a view here. i'm a journalist, i've had many sources i protect and i wou
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)